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Ne1

Hi Eraserhead! I do love this place, too...

Good info you've included. Thanks. I can't afford grass-fed animals at the moment, but I have been making kombucha, so maybe that'll suffice for my vitamin K? I've also been foregoing sunscreen for my early morning walks, despite my genetic increased risk for skin cancers.

I read a Paleo blog eons ago that convinced me that hot showers, lots of soap, and sunscreen-at-all-times are not very good for us. Also that milk and meat really should be organic and etc. But I'm cheap, and at the moment, poor-ish. I did use grass-fed flank steak to make jerky, but in general eat the factory farm stuff. Makes me sad, but I just can't stomach (pun intended) the dramatically increased food budget. Plus, my focus, when I have one, is trying to limit my sugar intake. That isn't going well. ha. I'm on a steady diet of MnMs. :( But I figure it's better than booze... (Though the dietician where I went to rehab likened sugar to cocaine. She's not wrong, probably!) 

Thanks for your thoughts!

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EraserHead
On 3/8/2017 at 3:03 AM, Ne1 said:

I can't afford grass-fed animals at the moment, but I have been making kombucha, so maybe that'll suffice for my vitamin K?

I know, a grass-fed steak is expensive! A cheaper way to get K2 through food is to go with pastured eggs or butter/dairy from pastured cows (You will need register or log in to read this content or You will need register or log in to read this content are good choices). Or the fermented foods. I don't know about kombucha! I drink a lot of Kevita but have never investigated the K2 content...

But probably the cheapest way is just to take a supplement. I take You will need register or log in to read this content each day, which at $13.50 for a bottle of 60 comes to $0.23 / day. Cheap!

On the sugar, if you can slowly move yourself towards darker chocolate, it has a much lower sugar content but still satisfies that craving!

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SKendall

I just started Taurine with Vit. B and I feel amazing!

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Molly78

My understanding is that there is some evidence that taurine might have anti-depressant effects according to studies in rats.  It binds to GABA-A & GABA-B receptors, so could maybe have anti-anxiety effects like baclofen - not sure there is any research on this though.

I drink a can of Red Bull a day which contains both taurine & B vits.  It's promoted as an energy drink - maybe for that reason?

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SKendall

Ne, any sugar wants more sugar - kind of like cocaine, lol.  I believe the sugar in alcohol has us chasing more and more alcohol and I think this has been covered by the experts (NS),  and not by amateurs like me.

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EraserHead
12 hours ago, SKendall said:

I just started Taurine with Vit. B and I feel amazing!

I just read the Wikipedia page on Taurine... I knew it was in energy drinks, but had no idea of all the various effects! The effect on ApoB is particularly intriguing. Looks like a can of Red Bull has 1g. How much are you taking? And which Vit B? Do you just feel more energy?

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SKendall

EH, I am taking the NOW brand from Amazon.  Don't know the dosage.  I had knee surgery today or I would get up and take a look.  I know the Vit. B was in a therapeutic dose that I got in Mexico to promote the healing. I don't do energy drinks.  It helped my anxiety and promoted my sense of well being.  My daughter said she could sense my energy level just talking to me and it's been a long time since I could say that I've felt amazing even in my sobriety.  Definitely worth a shot, look up what a therapeutic dose is on the vit. B.

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SKendall

P.S.  My daughter is vegan so she isn't getting ANY taurine.  Sources are breast milk. meat and fish.  Maybe that's why she's erm, a bit (bitchy) cranky.  I will have to google what other vits and supplements she's missing out on as a vegan.

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BarrelChested
On 3/24/2017 at 3:12 PM, SKendall said:

I will have to google what other vits and supplements she's missing out on as a vegan.

@SKendall I was vegan for over nine years. I realize that seems a bit odd for a war-time veteran... but, well, I felt ethically-compelled to give it a shot (a health issue - likely caused by gluten - forced me back to an omnivorous diet). I also got a degree in Biology and knew that it's complete horsesh1t that there's anything truly/critically missing from a vegan diet (I was doing 100+ mi bike rides, lifting, etc). HOWEVER, it's absolutely possible to eat a diet of potato chips and cola and still be a "vegetarian" (or vegan).  Quite a few vegans/vegetarians suck at their diets; it's quite easy to make a great lifestyle choice into an unhealthy one. SO...

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That's the link to the "100 best foods." Of course, you can (and should) look at the rest of the site. It's excellent. They provide great, science-based articles (with citations) and even embed real data (it's kinda hidden -- you have to dig; only science geeks care about those data). Since your daughter is venturing outside of the mainstream, she really should pay attention -- really ensure that she's getting everything she needs. A vegetarian/vegan diet can/should be far superior to a traditional American diet (way easier to get anthocyanins, photo pigments, etc).  The nine amino acids humans cannot synthesize are phenylalanine, valine, threonine, tryptophan, methionine, leucine, isoleucine, lysine, and histidine. So, taurine (or creatine or whatever) isn't really a concern. Do you know what really helps us? Our guts -- the microflora in our guts are responsible for synthesizing or making bio-available a lot of the "stuff" we need to survive.

And about the gut: I suffered regular bloody diarrhea for twenty years. I thought that it was due to some pre-Iraq injections they gave us (after which we were ineligible to donate blood... which I think is still true). That injection probably fscked-up my microbiota. Meh. So, fast-forward to training for a 200mi bike ride, last year. It turns-out that gluten has been brutalizing me for decades. I found-out by accident (whist breaking from a ketogenic diet).  Your daughter really should read "The Paleo Approach," by Sarah Ballantyne. NOTE: when I hear "paleo," I kind-of cringe -- for it's so often just some spurious bullsh1t that's not grounded in science. This book is a little different (I did find two minor "leaps of faith" which don't bear the scrutiny of "true science..." but they don't impact much of the body of assertions made by the book). 

Vegans probably need to be ever more careful about protecting their gut health -- for their diets do lack a little diversity... and it's VERY easy to be a cr*ppy vegan. Oh, yeah, I was stunned (and sad) to figure-out that potatoes are also not good for me (this is, apparently, not a new thing -- they've known that they jack with people for hundreds of years; go figure).

 

I hope to some day return to a more ethical diet. I don't mind killing to live. This is just the way of the world. I DO mind subjecting animals to a lifetime of misery just so that I can have something "tasty." Corporate animal farming is heinously cruel. The image you have of pastoral life is fringe at best. If you need examples, I'm happy to provide information. Oh, and the meat we eat in this country tastes... well, it doesn't -- it has little flavor. Go to Argentina to find-out what meat is SUPPOSED to taste like; you'll be disgusted by our bland, hormone/antibiotic-laden sorry excuse for meat. We treat animals like sh1t... and this is a nice bit of revenge. I digress. I wish your daughter good health and hope that she'll really make the effort. I had a lot more energy when I wasn't eating meat (and my feces was less fragrant).

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Nicnak

I've tried most diets in my life but my most successful was last summer when I was indifferent for over 4 months.Not drinking wine made it very easy to loose weight and I lost 3.5 stone following a calorie controlled diet.I ate a vey healthy diet but it did include carbs as in pasta,cous cous,rice and quinoa but ni bread.I weighed everything and ate no more than 1200 calories but never went hungry.Most people say counting calories doesn't work but it worked for me as well as walking 1 and a half hours a day 

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Nicnak

I now weigh 9.7 stone and I'm 5 foot 2.I used to be 8 stone but know I'll never be that again 

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EraserHead
On 3/26/2017 at 11:31 AM, Nicnak said:

I've tried most diets in my life but my most successful was last summer when I was indifferent for over 4 months.Not drinking wine made it very easy to loose weight and I lost 3.5 stone following a calorie controlled diet.I ate a vey healthy diet but it did include carbs as in pasta,cous cous,rice and quinoa but ni bread.I weighed everything and ate no more than 1200 calories but never went hungry.Most people say counting calories doesn't work but it worked for me as well as walking 1 and a half hours a day 

Here is a little story for you (see the attached chart for a graphic illustration): In August of 2015 I returned home from vacation and stepped on the scale to find I had reached a new high: 205 lbs. I thought, Time to lose some weight! Hired a trainer and worked with him 2x a week, went running mornings, played tennis on the weekends, ate mostly salads, and continued to drink, though a bit less than earlier in the summer. Kept it up for several months, and by end of December, with 5 months of exercise and effort, I had lost almost 10 lbs. Yay!

Then on Christmas Day I had a minor ski accident while neglecting to wear a helmet, resulting in a subarachnoid hemorrhage (brain bleed)... Doc suggested not to exercise and not to drink for a month, which I voluntarily turned into 2 months, just to be on the safe side (I'm a stubborn drinker, but a brain bleed is a very scary thing). As you can see in the chart, there was an immediate and precipitous drop in weight, while getting zero exercise, other than walking to the store and back. By early March I was down to 178!

That, for me, was a pretty stark lesson in how alcohol and weight loss don't get along!

 

FullSizeRender.jpg

Edited by EraserHead
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BarrelChested

In my personal experience, the three biggest factors in weight loss are 1) sleep 2) booze and 3) diet.  Exercise (I do quite a bit -- typically at LEAST an hour per day) is less relevant than people might expect (er, this has been my experience). A year ago, I had a gout attack following a nearly 200mi bike ride. Around that time, I figured-out that gluten is VERY bad for me. So, although I was a mess, I had committed to doing the AIP diet (this is an elimination protocol). It expressly forbid booze. I love to drink... but constant bloody diarrhea just isn't the party people expect.  I dropped 27lbs  (or was it 24?) in two months doing almost NO exercise and no calorie restriction whatsoever. My intention was to heal my gut -- with the promise to myself that I'd try to lose weight after six months of the AIP diet. So... consider adding that anecdotal account to your "data."

Ah, and the very first thing I added back (to my diet) was booze.  I got mild diarrhea (which is just lovely in comparison to the bloody, painful mess I'd been experiencing)... and few other ill effects... save that my weight loss stopped. In fact, I slowly started to put the pounds back on. I theorize that booze causes dysbiosis.  It's hardly a radical theory.

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Jetsman32

@EraserHead that is a pretty powerful chart! I've had a similar experience. In the last 10 weeks I've lost 30bls and only drank twice. There is no way I could have done that on the booze- especially because I go to the gym at 6am to workout. I am also going to go on Amazon today and check out Taurine. I know it's in my pre-energy drink but would like to see how regular dosing would effect me.

Quick question on Vitamin D. Right now (and for the last 2 weeks) I have been taking 2000 BIU in the morning pre-workout. Is that enough? I haven't noticed any real difference in my mood or allergies. I'd love some advice on this. Thank you!

Also- I don't do anything organic. Maybe I should but I just don't care enough. Right now for me it's all about getting 180g of protein per day from healthy sources like chicken breast, tuna, whey protein, greek yogurt, nuts and egg whites. Seems to be doing the job so far. Also- we do not have a whole foods or Trader Joe's in my town so my food shopping selection is pretty much limited to Wal-Mart. Fun times!

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BarrelChested

@Jetsman32  Vitamins A, D, E, and K are fat-soluble. You have to be careful with these... for they can be toxic.  The absolute best source of vit-D is sunlight striking your bare (i.e., without sunscreen) skin.  I was recently diagnosed with a vit-D deficiency (it's common as we age) and prescribed 1000 units (standard OTC dose) per day.  The best sources of vit-K are organic kale (You will need register or log in to read this content ) and spinach.  I'm frugal... but I pop for organic produce on that list.  There's no conclusive evidence that pesticide residues (no, you can't wash them away) are bad for us.... but my intuition is that they're probably not good.  When it comes to red meat, grass-fed, pasture-raised, "organic" beef has a far more favorable omega-3 to 6 balance. I prefer to eat more pork than chicken -- because chicken is high in omega-6 (that's bad).  Also, when you take fat-soluble vitamins, consume them with fat (helps you uptake them).

Good work on the weight loss!  Oh, and if you eat bacon, it's probably best to consume uncured, nitrate-free bacon.

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EraserHead
On 4/3/2017 at 8:27 PM, BarrelChested said:

Exercise (I do quite a bit -- typically at LEAST an hour per day) is less relevant than people might expect (er, this has been my experience). 

I totally agree, and have learned the same just by self-experimentation.... There was an interesting article in Scientific American a couple months ago that argues that the whole model we have of "we exercise to burn off calories and hence lose weight" seems to be flawed, if not flat-out wrong. They found people burn roughly the same number of calories each day no matter how much exercise they get, and argue that our metabolisms are tightly regulated in this way.

This isn't to say that exercise isn't good for you -- in certainly is. And it may lead to weight loss in indirect ways, by increasing muscle mass and changing your eating habits, but the whole idea of "I'm going to stay on the treadmill an extra 15 minutes to burn off last night's tiramisu" could be totally wrong.

I tried to present this idea during a family get-together a couple months ago, and was surprised at the force of resistance I got in return! They are all exercise junkies, so I guess that's what happens when you challenge people's core beliefs...

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EraserHead
On 4/4/2017 at 6:50 AM, Jetsman32 said:

@EraserHead that is a pretty powerful chart! I've had a similar experience. In the last 10 weeks I've lost 30bls and only drank twice. There is no way I could have done that on the booze- especially because I go to the gym at 6am to workout. I am also going to go on Amazon today and check out Taurine. I know it's in my pre-energy drink but would like to see how regular dosing would effect me.

Quick question on Vitamin D. Right now (and for the last 2 weeks) I have been taking 2000 BIU in the morning pre-workout. Is that enough? I haven't noticed any real difference in my mood or allergies. I'd love some advice on this. Thank you!

Also- I don't do anything organic. Maybe I should but I just don't care enough. Right now for me it's all about getting 180g of protein per day from healthy sources like chicken breast, tuna, whey protein, greek yogurt, nuts and egg whites. Seems to be doing the job so far. Also- we do not have a whole foods or Trader Joe's in my town so my food shopping selection is pretty much limited to Wal-Mart. Fun times!

That's great! I am actually trying to do the same thing again now.

I also started taking the Taurine (I got Life Extension 1000mg, and am taking one on an empty stomach every morning). A few days so far...

On the vit D: I take 5,000 IU per day ("Dr. Cannell's Advanced D"), and that keeps me right in the sweet spot. I think the only way to know what is enough or too much is to measure it, by asking your doctor to add a You will need register or log in to read this content to your next lipid panel. If it's below 40, you're too low. If it's over 100, you're too high. 50-80 would be ideal. You can also look at c-reactive protein -- a general marker of inflammation -- to make sure that isn't getting too high. Everyone lives in different latitudes and has different levels of sun exposure, so it's hard to give any blanket recommendation. I'm not sure that you would notice anything in particular on a day-to-day basis, though some people have trouble sleeping if they take it too late in the day. The "not getting colds" thing was something I just noticed about 6 months after I started, when everyone else was getting sick. I also take carotenoids, which would also be helping with that.

I agree with everything @BarrelChestedsaid. You should take the vit D (and most other vitamins) with some source of fat, or it won't absorb. Keep in mind that studies that show toxicity in those vitamins often test them in isolation and don't consider possible synergistic effects with other vitamins (along with various other methodological problems and oversimplifications). There is an interaction among D, calcium and K2 where they need to work in concert, and failing to get enough D or K2 will result in calcium ending up in the wrong places, like your arteries.

Finally, it's important to distinguish between vitamins K1 and K2, as they are totally different. When people usually refer to "Vitamin K," they mean K1, which is found in leafy green vegetables, like kale and spinach. It helps with blood clotting, which is important on a short-term timescale, so your body has a mechanism for recycling K1 and making sure you don't get too low on it. K2, on the other hand, is found in fermented foods and the fat of grass-fed meats and dairy. It works in concert with vitamin D to redistribute calcium into the right places (e.g., bones). Your body has no way to recycle it, and, in the modern diet, most people are deficient.

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BarrelChested

I like Michael Pollan's advice: "eat [real] food... not too much... mostly vegetables." By "real" he means food that people from a few hundred years ago would recognize (and be able to pronounce and identify every component thereof). I firmly believe (based on several experiences) that health and weight are almost entirely diet-bound. Oh, and BTW -- kimchi is not only [relatively] easy to make (it's time-consuming) but delicious and great for your microbiota.  ANnnnnnd, aside from visiting an Army post (the community surrounding it), making your own is the only way to get kimchi that doesn't suck. It's a traditional food. YMMV.

 

Oh, yeah -- take care of your gut. Those microbes synthesize or make bio-available damned near most of the stuff we need to survive.

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Felina

 

On 4/4/2017 at 8:50 AM, Jetsman32 said:

Quick question on Vitamin D. Right now (and for the last 2 weeks) I have been taking 2000 BIU in the morning pre-workout. Is that enough? I haven't noticed any real difference in my mood or allergies. I'd love some advice on this. Thank you!

Jets, I have been supplementing with Vitamin D for a couple of years now. I take 5000 IUs a day during the winter, and the same dosage in the summer but less often (3-4x/week or so). Anyway, I recently had some pretty comprehensive bloodwork done. One of the things that was clear was that my Vitamin D levels were perfect. So although I'm going a bit above the RDA for Vitamin D during the winter it appears to be necessary. During the summer I make an effort to be out in the sun a lot more.

Also, the only thing I've noticed re: my mood since starting Vitamin D supplementation was that, although I don't notice any change in mood while taking it, I did manage to get through the last couple of winters without my old buddy Seasonal Affective Disorder. 

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