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The End of my Addiction

Baclofen: HOW does it feel?


Alcofree
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Dear ALL, Alcofree here. I started on 5 mg Baclofen on the 1st of December last year. Hitting 150 mg tomorrow. Going up by 12,5mg every four days. Tried to go faster and/or by higher mg- the side effects made me back down again. So this is my pace now- 12,5mg (half of 25 mg tablet) every four days. What I need to ask is this: HOW does it actually feel once you reach the indifference? Do I just wake up one morning and kinda know I will never drink again? Basically, what do I need to look out for when I reach indifference? How will I feel? What exactly changes? I still crave booze. And I still drink. Many thanks for all your help and support during my struggle. Kindest regards. 

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Someone will be along in  a minute who titrated up while still drinking, several people here ave done that.  I tried it the first time & just kept drinking, eventually gave up.

Second time round I stopped drinking first, then titrated up quite fast - you don't get such bad SE if you're not drinking.  I was only able not to drink because I had faith that the craving would go away & it did - never really seemed to get a hold.

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Hi. I started baclofen 12/12 and I did drink moderately as I titrated up. I found that if I had 3 drinks I had to nap. My goal was to drink on occasion with friends and to not drink at home alone. 

My doctor wouldn't allow me to go above 80 mgs so I struggled a little bit to reach indifference. What I mainly felt with bac was relaxed and calm. What a freaking relief. I had no idea I was anxious and wrapped so tight. 

I hope I helped some  others will chime in soon  

 

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Hi MissyKC,

So glad that Baclofen is working for you!:)

I am a 55-year-old woman and I have been AF for several years.   I started taking Bac in May, 2010. I titrated up to my max dose of  90 mgs. per day and maintained that dosage until about 2011. I was a social drinker and a very moderate drinker in my 30s, but then in my mid-40s, my drinking started to spin out of control as I rose through the ranks in the automotive industry.   Drinking was a habit for me more than anything as I had grown up in an Irish Catholic and French Canadian family where wine was part of the evening meal.  As  my automotive career got more stressful and my anxiety grew, I drank at home, alone, trying to escape the overwhelming anxiety I have suffered from since I was 4-years-old.   Along with being anxious, I have a short fuse...a quick temper.  At my maintenance dosage of 20 mgs. per day, the Baclofen takes the edge off my anxiety and lengthens my fuse so I don't blow up at people as easily when I am angry.   If I forget to take my Bac, and I do from time to time, I notice that I am more easily agitated. I wish I had known about Baclofen when I was in my 20s and 30s, when my anxiety was off the rails, causing me to lose jobs and my self-esteem.

Baclofen alone is not the key to getting and maintaining long-term sobriety.  You really have to WANT it.  I changed my people, places and things.  I changed my morning work out routine to after-work so I would exercise through the witching hour.  By the time I got home, I didn't even think about drinking. I wanted something to eat, a shower, and bed.  As far as changing places...I severed ties with a woman I really liked but the only thing we had in common was drinking.  I  also severed ties with people in my life who were huge triggers for my drinking because they made me so terribly angry.   Besides the Baclofen, I took Naltrexone for cravings. I had good luck with NAL. I tried Campral as well but it caused such GI distress, I stopped taking it after the first day.

I was on 90 mgs. of Baclofen for about 15 months, and I have been on 20 mgs of Baclofen since early 2011. During that time, I had the chance to talk to Dr. Fred Levin several times before he lost his license, and he told me that when I reached indifference, it would be a wonderful and dramatic feeling.  He was right.:)  

 

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The feeling is simple; you just don't feel like drinking alcohol. It's a strange one, but there is no wish to even have a taste of alcohol when I'm indifferent. I would rather have a soft drink or a cup of tea – basically anything without alcohol in it. If it crosses my mind to drink – hardly ever – the only response is 'why would you?'

I started taking Bac two years ago. I have not had a long period of indifference since; cravings would return and I would drink after six to eight weeks of a complete lack of any desire to drink. Long story, but Effexor was, it appears, the main culprit. When I was ready to stop taking Effexor last October I was also able to reduce my Baclofen dosage from 230mg p/day to 150mg.

I now use exercise, meditation and supplements plus see a clinical psychologist. I do notice the absence of any way to get an easy high.

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5 hours ago, MJM said:

The feeling is simple; you just don't feel like drinking alcohol. It's a strange one, but there is no wish to even have a taste of alcohol when I'm indifferent. I would rather have a soft drink or a cup of tea – basically anything without alcohol in it. If it crosses my mind to drink – hardly ever – the only response is 'why would you?'

I started taking Bac two years ago. I have not had a long period of indifference since; cravings would return and I would drink after six to eight weeks of a complete lack of any desire to drink. Long story, but Effexor was, it appears, the main culprit. When I was ready to stop taking Effexor last October I was also able to reduce my Baclofen dosage from 230mg p/day to 150mg.

I now use exercise, meditation and supplements plus see a clinical psychologist. I do notice the absence of any way to get an easy high.

Thank you! 

 

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